Their Problem is Usually Your Problem

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 We spend a lot of time wringing our hands over the problems that "others" have in our lives. The Board isn't strategic enough. The boss doesn't understand me. That department over there is not cooperative or competent. My spouse doesn't listen.

All of that may be true, but it's still up to you to figure out your contribution to the situation. I know it sounds a bit like blaming the victim, but what I'm really trying to do here is get out of the blame game altogether. If you have any kind of connection or relationship to this "other," than you're part of it. Period. So take the time to understand how you perpetuate what is going on and how you can shift. That doesn't prohibit you from helping the "other" to change as well. Heck, you can even walk away from it all.

But pouring excessive energy into a "why can't they be better" stance rarely gets you to the next level.

Photo source.

Let's Talk About Workplace Culture

1 Comments

  1. 15.07.2010 at 5:43 pm

    I wish all those whiners would just do something productive.
    Whoops, meta-whine.
    Getting over waiting for others to change and just doing something about it myself was a watershed in my professional life.

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